How to regulate temperature in a conservatory

A conservatory is a beautiful addition to the home, providing extra space, filled with light and warmth.

Conservatory

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According to an article in This Is Money, the majority of conservatories don’t need planning permission, and they are cheaper to build than other types of extension.

Keep warm conservatory

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However, as a room built mainly from glass, the conservatory isn’t always as warm, or as cool, as you might wish. That delightful light-filled space can become overpoweringly hot during summer days and can be uncomfortably cool during the winter months.

But there’s no need to panic! There are steps that you can take to ensure that your brand new conservatory is kept at a perfect temperature so that you can enjoy it all year round.

Keeping warm in winter

Some conservatory owners simply close the room up during the winter months, but this really isn’t necessary, as there are plenty of ways of keeping it warm enough to use.

Double glazing is essential to retain the warmth generated by your central heating system, and you can fit insulating blinds that will help to trap the heat, particularly during the evenings, although opaque options are also available, if you don’t mind losing out on a little daylight.

The floor is another vulnerable area which allows heat to escape, so carpeting or rugs can help to keep the heat trapped. You might like to install a dedicated heater for the room too; for example, when it comes to designers and manufacturers of conservatories Tewkesbury company, firmfix.co.uk/conservatories, offers clients a range of options, including radiators, underfloor heating or wall-mounted heaters, all of which can help to keep your conservatory toasty-warm, even in the coldest of weather.

Keeping cool in summer

During the hottest summer days, keeping your conservatory comfortably cool can be challenging, but installing blinds can be a useful first step in limiting the heat build-up throughout the day.

Double glazing comes into its own when the sun is blazing, and if you opt for tinted glass, much of the heat from the sun’s rays can be diminished, making the room much more comfortable, even when the mercury is soaring.

Installing a fan is a useful option, but for the best results an air conditioning unit is probably the best way forward, helping you to keep you cool in summer and warm in winter.

What is the Beast from the East?

Back in late February 2018, the United Kingdom experienced a long period of extremely cold weather that we hadn’t seen for many years before. People were scrambling to stock up their shelves with food as well as turning their heating up a few more degrees in a bid to keep themselves nice and warm. To make sure that your heating system is functioning at its optimum level you should ensure that you have a Gloucester Boiler servicing company visit once a year to give your boiler the once over. Boilers are one of the main ways that we heat our homes and offices and so should be regularly inspected and serviced.

These periods of extreme weather are often described as ‘Beast from the East’ this is due to the fact that the cold conditions are produced as a result of a strong wind originating from the eastern areas. This is more likely in the United Kingdom when there is a high-pressure environment over the Scandinavian region. Britain is one of the wettest and windiest places in Europe and the reason why we are so susceptible to this is that we are an island.  As mentioned before, the “beast from the East” occurred because we were hit by a blast of cold air directly from Siberia and Scandinavia. This is not usually the case. For the most part, our winters are mild and wet. If you want to know what the weather is going to do its pretty much a good bet to look at the wind direction first.

To the west of Britain is the Atlantic Ocean. Not only that but we also lie in the natural phenomenon known as the Gulf Stream. This is a flow of warm water from the Gulf of Mexico that flows over the Atlantic and around the country up the English Channel in the South and around the Outer Hebrides in the North into the North Sea. It keeps the really cold water away from us. The Atlantic generates strong winds and low pressure which usually bring in milder wet weather. If you see a weather report and the wind is a southwest/westerly direction it is very likely that we will be mild. In the winter the two fronts fight above us for dominance, the cold North and easterly blasts bring cold air and converting that cloud and rain into snow, against the valiant defense of the milder air. This time the east wind won, big time.

Watch the weather next time; you see the cold deflected to the coast of Norway where it turns the milder air to snow. This is why they spend lots more on grit and snow ploughs than we do.